Finland makes sustainability easier

Töölönlahti Helsinki, Finland
Reading time: 2 minutes

A leading Northern European airline emails customers, saying it is moving ‘towards a better climate future’.

Reusable grocery bags are spotted all over hipster neighbourhoods of Helsinki, Stockholm, Oslo, Copenhagen, and Tallinn.

Local Facebook flea market groups are buzzing: buying second hand is a popular move.

In the small neighbourhood of Jätkäsaari in Helsinki, there are two second-hand shops. People can drop off their used clothing and items and have them sold for a small service fee. Both shops have opened up only this year (Jätkäsaari is seeing a lot of development). It looks like business is doing well.

Let’s be honest, doing your part to combat climate change is trendy in Nordic countries. It’s also considered essential for the public relations efforts of companies.

Protecting the climate and being sustainable isn’t a bad move to make – for all kinds of reasons. By 2030, the sustainability industry will create more than USD12 trillion in business opportunities, according to one estimate.

Of course, the interest in preventing climate change and sustainability is real. Those melting glaciers are undeniable from where we sit. Northern Europe also produced Swedish Greta Thunberg, the famed teenage climate activist who is even better than Donald Trump at Twitter.

Given the market demand wide-spread interest, sulonorth is also jumping on the sustainability wagon.

On Tuesday, we began a regular series of posts related to Nordic sustainability efforts. We kicked the series off with an exciting issue close to the heart of every Northern Europe resident: waste management and recycling.

Jokes aside, being able to contribute to the circular economy and focus on living in a more sustainable manner is one of the joys of being a Helsinki resident. The city makes social responsibility more achievable. Sustainability is usually difficult. All too often guilt and a sense of helplessness replaces action. Yet, for many, the only choice Helsinki offers is to live in a more sustainable manner.

The priority Finland gives to sustainability is driven by both a moral responsibility and self-interest. For example, it would be very bad for the Finnish forestry industry if temperatures rise too much. The forestry industry is critical for Finland’s economy.

Watch for more on the circular economy and sustainability in the coming weeks.

Yellow rental bikes make sustainability in Helsinki, Finland easier
Save Finland’s trees, rent a bike!

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