Want to Live in Finland? Tips From a New Arrival

Figure in snow outside Helsinki, Finland
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I moved to Finland in January from Vushtrri, Kosovo. As an international student, I also work in Helsinki and have an internship.

Why do I want to live in Finland? Everyone’s goal is to live the highest quality and most stable life possible. Finland surely offer that to you.

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What would I tell someone considering a move to Finland?

Finland needs international workers. The Director General of the country’s migration department has said: “The basic premise is that, in addition to the domestic workforce, Finland needs employees also from abroad. There is intense competition in the world for international talents.”

Open Spaces

You’ll probably need to be prepared for some cultural and lifestyle changes. For example, looking at Finland for the first time from an airplane, I noticed the lack of colors. At that moment, Finland seemed only black and white – darkness and light. Of course it was wintertime. Other seasons in Finland are very colorful, though that monotone first impression has stuck with me.

Also, outside of a few urban areas, Finland is very low-density in terms of population. You really see that as you descend. There’s huge expanses of open land. While Finland’s population is only about 5.5 million, it’s land mass is 303,815 km2 – that’s a lot of empty space. There’s a huge distances between buildings in some areas, and the land is filled with forests.

View of Finland from the air during winter.
Wintertime view of Finland from an airplane.

Simple architecture

Get on the ground, exit the airport, and notice the architecture. There’s a fantastic simplicity to the architecture in Finland. Finns are all about efficiency: “If it works perfectly, you don’t have to complicate it. Keep its destiny clear and simple!” That seems to be the unspoken motto.

No small talk 

Did I mention unspoken? The distances between houses seems to help people keep at a distance, in order not to disturb others and to work in silence by themselves. At the least, Finns really do appreciate personal space.

One point is unambiguous. Most Finns are not accustomed to small talk. That doesn’t mean that there’s a fear of small talk. It’s just not a common experience for most people. If you come from a more collectivist society, this aspect of Finland may really shock you. If you want company without priorities or purpose, Finland may not be the right place for you.

Helsinki Sunset Pink
Sunset over Helsinki.

Independent culture 

The stoic independence of Finns created a culture of self-service. Many services – such as buying public transport tickets or paying taxes – are done by individuals themselves, rather than a service provider. Having up to date tech tools is important in order to access the apps and other systems you’ll need. You’ll be helping yourself, and also the overall economy, run more smoothly and transparently.

So, how long will it take to get over the culture shock after moving to Finland? I’d say just two or three months and you’ll appreciate every detail of this wonderful country, which has the most beautiful scenery in the world. You’ll find your peaceful moment here, of a type you won’t ever find anywhere else.

Krenare Bunjaku is a marketing intern at sulonorth. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Facebook.

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NOTE: The above post was amended on 31 OCT to clarify that Krenare arrived in Helsinki as an international student.

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